Item #4574 [Kootenay Ghost Town] Photo of Railway Repair Crew Working on Wooden Trestle Bridge at Retallack, BC in 1957. Unknown Photographer.
[Kootenay Ghost Town] Photo of Railway Repair Crew Working on Wooden Trestle Bridge at Retallack, BC in 1957

[Kootenay Ghost Town] Photo of Railway Repair Crew Working on Wooden Trestle Bridge at Retallack, BC in 1957

n.p. 1957. Photograph. The photo is captioned verso "Retallack, 1957" and shows a crew of men working on the rails of a wooden trestle bridge using human, hydraulic and what appears to be, steam power from a flatbed car. A gelatin silver photograph print, measuring 4.5 x 6.5 inches wide, with the white border trimmed, ink captions verso and some overall toning. A very uncommon Kootenay image. Good or Better. Item #4574

From Ghost Towns of British Columbia "Originally known as Bells Camp in the B.C.’s Valley of the Ghosts, the town grew to a population of about 300 before the turn of the 20th century. It was also known as Whitewater when the K & S Railway came through in 1895. It later changed to Retallack in 1928, named after J.L. Retallack, a prominent businessman in the district and one of the original locators and owners of the Whitewater mine. Retallack was the shipping centre for several mines in the area and also had a saw and planning mill, which burnt down in 1910 and was never rebuilt. The town once boasted three hotels, several stores, a barber shop, post office and school. In 1901, the CPR opened a telegraph office at the town site. Mining activity in and around Retallack ceased in 1967. Since then, most signs of the town’s mining days have disappeared. A few residents have remained near the former town site and a small resort hotel is still operating. Two former mine buildings on the north side of Highway 31A, and a nearby house foundation, are the most obvious reminders of Retallack’s once prosperous days." accessed June, 2023.

Price: $85.00 CAD  other currencies