A Map Shewing the Communication of the Lakes and the Rivers Between Lake Superior and Slave Lake in North America. (Northwest Passage, Fur Trade, Lewis & Clark). Peter Pond, Edward Cave, pseud Sylvanus Urban.
A Map Shewing the Communication of the Lakes and the Rivers Between Lake Superior and Slave Lake in North America. (Northwest Passage, Fur Trade, Lewis & Clark)

A Map Shewing the Communication of the Lakes and the Rivers Between Lake Superior and Slave Lake in North America. (Northwest Passage, Fur Trade, Lewis & Clark)

London: Edward Cave [Sylvanus Urban, pseud.], 1790. Hardcover. Pond's only published map, representing an accumulation of his extensive travels throughout the northwest and a great cartographical accomplishment, considering his only navigational tool was a compass. "This map is of unique importance in the Pond story, for it disclosed the general geography of northwestern America." (Gough) and is based on Pond's map of 1787, which in turn was based on his earlier map of 1785. Also, "The map was the basis for Jefferson's Corps of Discovery." ie. the Lewis and Clark expedition [LOC Wise Guide] which contributed to - for better or worse, Alexander Mackenzie's indefatigable search for the Northwest Passage. Engraved fold-out map (borders measure 7-3/4 x 9-3/16 inches wide) with "Gent. Mag. March 1790, Pl. I. p. 197." at upper right corner. Article [a letter from Isaac Ogden in Quebec to his father in London] and the map, remain bound within "The Gentleman's Magazine : and Historical Chronicle. For the Year MDCCXC" [volume bound in half leather over paper covered boards, 8vo (8-1/4 inches tall), pp. iv, 579, [580], indexes, is well illustrated throughout with many fold-outs ; text is near fine, slightly trimmed, binding worn with two plates standing a little proud from the text block]. Map is a very good impression, also slightly trimmed, but having good margins remaining on all four sides and with the plate mark still evident. Folded as issued. Very Good. Item #2754

The map shows a river connection between Slave Lake and the North Pacific running through "Cooks or Slave River" with "So far Pond" on the east, "So far Cook" on the west and "Falls said to be the largest in the known world" somewhere in the middle. This was the Northwest Passage theory as told by the well traveled Pond. The article, titled "Description of the Country from Lake Superior to Cook's River. Extract of a Letter from *****, of Quebec, to a Friend in London. ( See our Plate I. )." is dated Nov. 7, 1789 and ends thus "The person from whom I had my information is Peter Pond, who was supplied with the proper instruments here to take his latitude, and instructed fully in the knowledge of astronomy and etc., etc. His latitude is undoubtedly right, and his longitude is nearly right. It was taken by some persons sent from York River, several hundred miles to the westward of it ; and from thence, by the courses of the rivers and lakes, no great mistake can be made. Another man, by the name of M'Kenzie, was left by Pond at Slave Lake, with orders to go down the river, and from thence to Unalaska, and so to Kamskatska, and thence to England, through Russia, etc. If he meets with no accident, you may have him with you the next year." which would have been a most epic journey in any age. Ref. Hayes p. 64 ; B. Gough "The Elusive Mr. Pond" (D&M 2014).

Price: $690.00 CAD  other currencies